Sep 122012
 

Your Windows logon password–the one you type every time you boot– is easily hacked.

windows password recovery, recover Windows passwordThat finding was made by two security researchers who’ve been studying ways to increase the reliability of tools designed to extract Windows registry information.¬†The logon password isn’t intended to protect your files. It’s intended to keep others from logging onto your computer¬†as you.

Why is that important? Because you do things on your computer that only you should be allowed to do, such as read and write your email. Unless you’ve set up your mail client to require a password every time you boot, anyone who can log onto your computer as you has full access to your mail.

And remember that only someone logged on with an administrator-level account can install software or make other important changes. You need a way to control that.

If you want to protect your files, you should encrypt them. And that brings up the exception I promised to tell you about: the Windows’ Encrypted File System (EFS).

EFS encrypts files automatically, in the background. When you’re logged in as yourself, the files appear normally. Otherwise, they’re indecipherable.

Not all editions of Windows come with EFS. For instance, in Windows 7, only the Professional and Ultimate editions have this feature. And that makes sense. Careless use of EFS can render your files permanently inaccessible to anyone–including yourself. EFS works best when there’s a IS department that knows what it’s doing, and users who don’t even have to know that their files need to be encrypted.

But there is a solution if you have a good and easy-to-use Windows password reset tool. Within few steps, you can reset your Windows password weekly or monthly for preventing being hacked, and no worry about if you lose the password, this Windows Password Recovery Tool could find it anytime.