Aug 012014
 

Where can I find my homegroup password? Can’t view homegroup password in Windows 8.1? A homegroup is a group of PCs on a home network that can share files and printers. Using a homegroup makes sharing easier. You can share pictures, music, videos, documents, and printers with other people in your homegroup.

You can help protect your homegroup with a password, which you view and change it anytime. Below we list 3 methods for you to find Windows 8.1 homegroup password. if you forgot your homegroup password, read please.

P.S.: Also be interested in how to find Windows 8 Homegroup password, click here for a further view.

Method 1: View Windows 8.1 Homegroup Password in File Explorer

Follow 3 easy steps to find Windows 8.1 homegroup password using file explorer.

  • Open File Explorer, click on Homegroup in the navigation pane.
  • Click on the HomeGroup tab on the ribbon, click on View password. Or, Right click on Homegroup in the navigation pane, click on View the HomeGroup password.

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  • You will now see the homegroup password that you can also print out if you want.

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Method 2: Find Windows 8.1 Homegroup Password Using PC Settings

You can also easily see Windows 8.1 homegroup password in PC settings.

  • Open PC settings and click on Network on the left side.

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  • Click on HomeGroup on the left side; scroll down on the right side to see the homegroup password under Password.

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Method 3: Find Windows 8.1 Homegroup Password Using HomeGroup Control Panel

Follow 3 easy steps below to view Windows 8.1 homegroup password in homegroup Control Panel.

  • Open Control Panel and click on HomeGroup icon. Then click on the View or print the homegroup password link.

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  • Now you can find the homegroup password and you can print it out if you like.

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To sum up, we have listed 3 methods for you to find homegroup password in Windows 8.1. If you suffer finding the password, just have a try.

Jun 092014
 

Recently, I have upgraded my notebook from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1, the latest version of Windows Operating System. But what makes me annoyed is that some keyboard shortcuts in Windows 7 fail to suit Windows 8.1 anymore. I spend a lot of time to search the new keyboard shortcuts in Windows 8.1. I’m sure that I am not the only one who has the confusion, so I’d like to share you new Windows 8.1 keyboard shortcuts here.

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Win + D: show and hide the desktop.

Win + E: launch File Explorer both from the Desktop and Start screen.

Win + L: lock Window 8.1 PC and takes you to the Lock screen.

Win + X: launch a hidden menu (also named WinX menu or the power user’s Start Menu)    with many useful shortcuts.

Ctrl + Shift + Esc: open Task Manager.

Win + F1: launch the Windows Help and Support documentation provided by Microsoft.

Win + C: bring out the Charms bar, where you can navigate with the arrow keys on your keyboard.

Win + I: display the Settings charm, which you can use to access Control Panel, Personalization options, the System information section and the Windows Help and Support module etc.

Win + Tab: switch between apps and the desktop.

Alt + Tab: switch between all apps, including desktop apps.

Alt + F4: completely shut down a Windows Store app and bring you to the desktop. If you are on the Desktop, it will display the old Shutdown dialog box.

Windows key: if you are on the Desktop when pressing it, it will bring you to the Start screen; press again, go back to the Desktop. If you press it when you are in a Windows 8.1 app, it takes you to the Start screen and pressing again bring you back to the app.

Escape: when you are on the Start screen, you can go back to the Desktop by pressing Esc key. But if you are on the Desktop, this shortcut makes nonsense.

End: when on the Start Screen, pressing End key will take you to the last or left-most Tile or Icon of the bottom-most row.

Win + Spacebar: choose a keyboard language and pick a different keyboard layout.

Here I list 15 new keyboard shortcuts in Windows 8.1 that you may use often. Knowing these shortcuts enables you increase productivity.

Feb 222014
 

 

Windows 8 users know that we no longer press a certain key during the boot process to access the Advanced Boot Option in Windows 8. That is because Windows 8 hardware uses the UEFI replacement for the traditional BIOS. It boots so blisteringly fast that it theoretically gives you only 200 milliseconds to access the boot menu.

Generally, Windows 8 allow us to enter boot menu through PC settings or use your installation disk. However, sometimes our computer encounter may have problems and can’t boot. Worse still, the installation disk isn’t always in hand. Thus, is there any way to set up Windows 8 to use F8 to enter Advanced Boot Options?

Note: If you’ve installed Windows 8 on an existing computer that uses the legacy BIOS system, you’ll access the BIOS in the traditional way.

1, Insert Windows 8 installation disc and restart your computer

2, Choose Keyboard & Language options and click Next in the setup box

3, On the next screen, click Repair your computer

4, In Choose an option interface, go for Troubleshoot and then Advanced options

5, In Advanced options, click for Command Prompt and access system drive (For example C:)

6, Type the command line BCDEDIT /SET {DEFAULT} BOOTMENUPOLICY LEGACY and press Enter

7, Type Exit and press Enter to restart your computer

8, Now you will be able to use F8 key for displaying Advanced Boot Options

So if you want to set up Windows 8 to use F8 to enter Advanced Boot Options, just follow our easy steps.

Dec 212013
 

Still leave your computer at risk when you get up and walk away? It’s time to set Windows to secure itself and save power when not in use. In fact, Windows has a built-in feature to shut down itself to protect your computer and save the power when no one has touched the keyboard or mouse for a set period of time.

Below I list 3 different ways you can use to suspend Windows when you’re not using it.  All of them, by default, require you to reenter your logon password to regain access.

Lock

After Windows locked, it doesn’t power down but displays the logon screen (or the screen saver of your choice). In this way, you can protect your computer from malicious access but can’t save power.

How to set up:

1. For Windows 7, click Start, type screen saver, and select Change screen saver.

2. For Windows 8, type screen saver in Home screen, click or tap Settings, and select Change screen saver.

3. To lock the screen automatically, check the On resume option and set the Wait option to an appropriate number of minutes.

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Sleep

When Windows sleeps, it will go into a suspended, low-energy mode and will wake up immediately when you press the power button. After waking up, you need to enter the password to back to where you left it.

How to set up:

1. For Windows 7, click Start, type sleep, and select Change when the computer sleeps.

2. For Windows 8, type sleep in the Start screen, click or tap Settings, then Change when the computer sleeps.

3. Set the “Turn off the display” and “Put the computer to sleep”.

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Hibernation

Unlike Lock and Sleep, a hibernating PC is a turned-off PC, effectively using no power at all. Windows copies everything in RAM to the hard drive, and then shuts the PC off entirely. When you reboot, everything is loaded back into RAM and the PC wakes up.

How to set up:

1. In the same applet where you set up Sleep, click the Change Advanced power settings link.

2. In the resulting dialog box, expand the Sleep section, then expandHibernate after, and set the minutes.

You can pick one or use all of them to set Windows to secure itself and save power when not in use. To use them, you can set up Windows to lock itself after five minutes, sleep after 20, and hibernate after 120 or any time you want.

P.S.: Unfortunately forgot password to unlock Windows? Turn to Windows Password Recovery for help.

Dec 042013
 

Microsoft introduced two major editions of Windows 8: Windows 8 (standard) and Windows 8 pro to us. Both of them are available for 64-bit and 32-bit. Do you know is your Windows 8 is 64-bit or 32-bit? This article will tell you how to determine if you have a 64-bit or 32-bit version of Windows 8 or Windows 8 Pro installed on your computer.

Why should I need to know Which Type of Windows 8 I Have?

It is important to know which type of Windows 8 you have as you need to choose the correct drivers and software for your operating system according to the type of Windows 8 you are using. For example, you have the 64-bit version of Windows 8 Pro installed and need to update your video card, and then you must download and install the drivers labeled “64-bit” by the manufacturer.

How to Determine If You Have Windows 8 64-bit or 32-bit?

 It’s extremely easy to determine if the copy of Windows 8 you have installed is 32-bit or 64-bit. Just follow our instructions below.

1, Open Windows 8 Control Panel and click on System and Security in Control Panel.

2, Click on System in the System and Security window to open the System applet.

3, Find the System area, located under the large Windows 8 logo. The System type will tell you either 64-bit Operating System or 32-bit Operating System you are using.

What’s the Difference between Windows 8 64-bit and32-bit?

The main difference between 32-bit and 64-bit is that64 bit version can handle more RAM and apps than 32 bit. The tendency of a computer’s processer to deal with information on RAM (random access memory) depends upon 32 bit and 64 bit version of Windows.

To put it simply,  64 bit version can deal with physical memory (RAM) above 4 GB and up to 128GB while 32-bit version can address RAM up to 4 GB only.

Now, you must have a clear idea about Windows 8 64-bit and 32-bit, and how to determine if you have a 64-bit or 32-bit version of Windows 8 or Windows 8 Pro installed on your computer.For more Windows 8 tips, click here.

Nov 182013
 

Windows Update is a Microsoft service that’s used to provide updates like service packs and patches for the Windows operating system and other Microsoft software. After you installed Windows 8.1, you will be asked about how you’d like Windows Update to work. You are also allowed to change those settings whenever you want. This article will show you how to change Windows Update Setting in Windows 8.1.

It is really easy to change Windows Update Settings in Windows 8.1 and making changes to Windows Update in Windows 8.1 should only take a few minutes. Here is a detailed guide about how to do it and steps below also apply to Windows 8.

1. Open Windows 8.1 Control Panel and click on the System and Security link.

2. In the System and Security window, click on the Windows Update link.

3. Click or tap the Change settings link to the left when Windows Update opens. This will open a window with a Choose your Windows Update settings heading.

4. Make changes you want and after you’ve made your choice, click the OK button to confirm the changes.

Details of Windows Update Settings in Windows 8.1

1. Check, Download, & Install

You can choose Install updates automatically from the drop-down box under Important updates to fully enable automatic updates.

2. Do Not Check At All

You are allowed to choose “Never check for updates” from the drop-down box under Important updates to completely disable automatic downloads, installations, and even checks for updates.

3. Check & Download

You can choose “Download updates but let me choose whether to install them” to make Windows Update to check for, and download, available updates. But the updates won’t install until you choose to install the updates.

4. Check Only

Choose “Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them” to stop Windows Update from downloading and installing updates.

Now you must have a clear idea about the details of Windows Update in Windows 8.1 and how to change Windows Update Setting in Windows 8.1. For more Windows 8 tips, click here.

Aug 302013
 

Want to check the hard drive in your Windows 8 computer so that you can fix the hard drive errors timely? All hard drives have a time of life, thus it is important to check a Windows 8 hard drive for errors. In fact, Windows 8 has a series of tools to help users determine whether or not their hard drive contains errors. This article will show you how to check a Windows 8 hard drive for errors using the built in Windows 8 scandisk utility.

How to Check a Windows 8 Hard Drive for Errors

Details of using built in Windows 8 scandisk utility to check the hard drive in your Windows 8 computer.

1. Start the Windows 8 Metro UI and type the word computer and the search prompt will automatically display. Select Computer.

2. Right click on the drive you want to test and select Properties. Select the Tools tab and choose Check in the Error checking section.

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3. If Windows prompts you there are no errors found, you can still check the drive anyway by selecting Scan drive.

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4. Wait for the error checking tool to complete and when error checking has completed you can click Close.

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If you find errors on your hard drive, you need to backup your hard drive with software such as Windows Boot Genius as soon as possible to avoid any data loss because many times hard drive failures are slow corruptions that happen over time, so it is important to see errors as a red flag of potential future failures. For more tips on Windows 8 hard drive failure, click here.